Crochet One-Skein Wonders: A Review

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Authors: Judith Durant and Edie Eckman
Genre: non-fiction, crafts, hobbies, crochet
First Published: 2013 by Storey Publishing
Pages: 288 (advance ebook version)

I have a complete addiction when it comes to buying craft book (that probably doesn’t come as a surprise!) but what my collection seriously lacks is a ‘go to’ crochet book when I fancy a new project. With so many fantastic patterns being easily accessible online crochet books really have to stand out to grab my attention, and I often struggle to find books that have more than one pattern that I would like to try.

What really drew me to this book was the idea of being able to complete projects with just one ball of yarn. Since I am taking part in the stash buster challenge, I have been busy seeking out patterns that I can complete using the bits and pieces that I have lying around…which isn’t as easy as it sounds!

The first thing that really stood out for me was that each section is divided into projects using the same yarn weight. This seems like a logical idea but it is the first crochet book that I have come across that does this! I have an extensive collection of double knitting yarn so having the projects divided by yarn weight would mean that I could flip straight to the relevant section of the book rather than having to leaf through all of the 101 projects to find suitable ones.

The other thing that really sold this book to me was the range of projects that it had in it. I find that a lot of craft books, knitting and crochet ones in particular, are swamped with patterns for scarves and babies. While this book does offer patterns for both of these, it isn’t inundated with them, and the projects range far and wide. Everything from jewellery to shrugs, bags to doll’s clothing is included and it is easy to find several projects that you want to get started on. If the range of products wasn’t enough, this book also covers a range of techniques including beading and Tunisian crochet.

This book really stands out for me when it comes to crochet books. I haven’t come across another book which includes such a large volume of projects that are so varied. I had no trouble deciding whether or not I will buy this book when it comes out in print, I simply can’t wait to get my hands on a copy! The difficult bit will be deciding which project to start first!

Rating: 10/10

I received this book as a free Advanced E-Reader Copy from NetGalley.  This book will be available for purchase on 12th March 2013 in USA and 13th April 2013 in UK.

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8 thoughts on “Crochet One-Skein Wonders: A Review

  1. Ginny says:

    That sounds like an awesome book. You are right about books not having a wide range of projects to do with one ball of yarn. I will definitely be taking a look at this when it comes out. One-ball projects are the best!

    • Hannah Ackroyd says:

      I think that is why my stash has grown so big! I always have to buy loads then end up having some left over which just gets abandoned in the cupboard! It’s great to see so many projects that can use up the bits and pieces that are left over. They are usually pretty speedy too!

    • Hannah Ackroyd says:

      Hi, the patterns don’t state a specific ability on them (e.g. beginner, intermediate or advanced) like I have seen some books do, but I have had another look through and it seems like there is a nice range of projects to cater for everyone. Most of the projects come with written instructions and a stitch diagram which I found useful when I was learning to read patterns and there are a few patterns that just use one or two different stitches. However, there are a few projects which use some stitches that I have never come across before so there are still some challenging projects for the more advanced crocheters too. There is a glossary in the back of the book which has written instructions for how to perform each stitch (e.g. DC = yarn over, insert hook into stitch or space, pull up a loop – three loops on the hook, (yarn over, pull through two loops) two times) and a list of the symbols used in the diagram but you would have to keep flipping from the pattern to the glossary if you were relying on it. I would say that anyone who has an idea of the basic stitches such as single crochet, double crochet, half double crochet and triple crochet should be able to find projects that they can complete and once they are confident with these they can progress onto some of the more advanced patterns. However, if it was something for a complete beginner you would probably find better books available which aim to teach the stitches as this book does assume that you at least know the basics. On a personal note, if it is the absolute basics you want I found that Youtube videos were helpful, particularly the channel CrochetGeek, which has some projects on there that you can follow along with which is useful because you can see the stitches performed as well as where they go! If you are an absolute beginner I would recommend a couple of these then you should be able to attack some of the patterns in the book without much trouble. Sorry about the long reply, I hope this helps!

    • Hannah Ackroyd says:

      Hi, my advance ebook uses US terms and as it is a US publisher I should imagine that both the US and UK print copies will use the US terms. There is a glossary of stitches in the back which describes the stitches (e.g. DC = yarn over, insert hook into stitch or space, pull up a loop – three loops on the hook, (yarn over, pull through two loops) two times) so that you can check which one is used. I hope this answers the question OK!

  2. lillelarsen says:

    Now that’s a book that the knitting/crocheting community definitely needed! I’m wondering though if the “one-skein” principle works with me, I seem to always, and I really mean ALWAYS be short of just half a skein for every project I make. Worth a try…

    • Hannah Ackroyd says:

      I know what you mean! I’m always a tiny bit away from the end but I never have quite enough yarn! The projects seem pretty small in this book so hopefully it will live up to it’s name!

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